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Museum Collections

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Scott Potter partners as a licensee with two internationally prominent and well known museums: Winterthur in Delaware and the Hearst Castle Collection in California.

With access to extensive and remarkable archival images to inspire his interpretations, Scott Potter is creating on an ongoing basis, new and special collections of glassware combining classically based decoupage technique with reproductions of the antique prints and antiquities at both museums.

Winterthur and the Hearst Castle Collection are vast repositories of exquisite artworks which lend themselves well to translations seen in many offerings at Scott Potter’s The Gilded Home. The museum collections that are presented online may also be requested as special orders for any of the additional styles of glassware that are shown on the Scott Potter website.

 

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William Randolf Hearst (1860-1951) was one of the most influential forces in the history of American journalism. Hearst was a populist multimillionaire who crusaded against political corruption. He fostered simultaneous excellence and sensationalism in reporting, transformed the graphic design of newspapers, and was in the vanguard of the development of newsreels. Hearst also became a conspicuous movie producer, a voracious collector and a most grand builder. 

Hearst Castle, San Simeon, La Cuesta Encantada (The Enchanted Hill), are all names given this magnificent 165 room estate built on two hundred fifty thousand acres overlooking the spectacular California coast at San Simeon Bay. Built from 1919 through 1947 by William Randoplh Hearst and Julia Morgan, the castle and the over twenty-thousand original antiques, antiquities and artworks that furnish it are now a California State Historical Monument and California State Park.

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In the early 20th century, Henry Francis du Pont created a grand country estate at Winterthur that today includes a 175-room house, a 60-acre naturalistic garden, and 1,000 acres of woodland and meadows. With an emphasis on both beauty and comfort, H.F. du Pont furnished the rooms of his home with American antiques and other decorative and fine art objects, representing the best in craftsmanship and style to Americans between 1640 and 1860.                              

By 1951 Mr. du Pont had transformed his home into Winterthur Museum. At the same time, he began to build a world class library, one that today contains more than 500,000 books, documents, and designs relating to the decorative arts. A very special section of the library is the Joseph Downs Collection of Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera. Carefully preserved in that collection is a group of Chinese watercolors from the late 18th and 19th centuries. The images, intended for Western consumers, include Chinese people in costume and realistic fruit, flowers, fish, birds, and insects painted in predominantly primary colors on British and Chinese papers.

Scott Potter has reproduced every detail of the beautifully colored images from the Winterthur Library for a line of decoupage decorative accesories that are certain to become an important part of today's living environments that emphasize unparalleled quality and beauty.